Fovitec- Understanding Bi Color, Kelvin Color Temperature, & White Balance
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Understanding Bi Color, Kelvin Color Temperature, & White Balance

Posted on July 03 2014

Understanding Bi Color and Kelvin Color Temperature Adjustments with the StudioPRO, Photo Pro Blogger! By Fovitec

Color temperature is the color of the light source that is emitted and measured in degrees Kelvin. Kelvin is the pure measurement of color within the absolute thermometric scale. Every light source has a color temperature and photographers and videographers must know the temperature of the scene is in order to get the white balance. White balance is the color balance that is set on a digital camera. You have the control in camera to adjust to your lighting conditions. It is called white balance, because essentially you are balancing your whites to appear pure white. By convention, yellow-red colors (like the flames of a fire) are considered warm, and blue-green colors (like light from an overcast sky) are considered cool. Confusingly, higher Kelvin temperatures (4500K or above) are what we consider cool and lower color temperatures (2700~3200K) are considered warm. Knowing this will save you from having to correct this is postproduction.  


In film or photo, there may be times when you want to have the temperature be warmer or cooler to convey a certain mood. A more yellow scene may be desired for interior low light scenes that have candlelight. When looking at photographs or watching a movie, ask—what mood does this light convey? Are the whites pure or do they have a color in the highlights?

Bi Color LED Panel Lights

Lights like our StudioPRO Bi Color LEDs let the photographer or videographer control the light temperature in the light panel itself. Thus, making it easier to light scenes with lighting combinations, combine with other existing lights, or create a desired light temperature. Bi Color LEDs provide a greater versatility and convenience without the hassle of filters to change the temperature. Bi Color LEDs have two dials on the back of the panel to adjust the intensity of light emitted at either 3200K or 54ooK. Our LEDs are split, half of the panel being 3200K LEDs and the other half being 5400K LEDs. Adjusting the dials will dim the respective LEDs to control the color of the light. Think of this method like mixing paint colors. Adding 3200K will warm, or add yellow, to your light output. Vice versa, adding 5400K will add blue to your light output. With both dials turned the result will be a combination of both.


600 LED Studio Light, Photo/Video, Bi-Color,Battery Base for Sony V-lock Battery - SP11-002-600

Warm White (incandescent white, candle light)








Incandescent & Candle, around 2700K

Incandescent white light bulbs often have a color temperature of up to 2900K. They imparts a more orange/red light on objects. Because you normally associate warmth with red or orange objects, this accounts for the "warm" descriptive name, even though it is a cooler temperature on the Kelvin scale.

Warm White (halogen white) 


Halogen, around 3000K

Halogen bulbs fall within the range of 2900K to 3500K. They impart a clear, white light with very little red or blue tones.

Neutral White


Around 4000K

Neutral White bulbs fall within the range of 4000K to 4700K. They impart a clear, white light with very little red or blue tones, but appears "cooler" than halogen light.

Cool White


Around 5000K

A "cool" white bulb commonly has a color temperature of 5000K or above. This is in the low range of blue color, similar to ice. Hence, the "cool" adjective.

Color rendition

Color rendition is how colors appear when illuminated by a light source. Most objects are not a single color, but a combination of many colors. Light sources that are deficient in certain colors may change the apparent color of an object.

The Color Rendition Index (CRI) is a 1-100 scale that measures a light source's ability to render colors the same way sunlight does. The top value of the CRI scale (100) is based on illumination by a 100-watt incandescent light bulb. A light source with a CRI of 80 or higher is considered acceptable for most indoor residential applications.


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