Shooting Glamour Portraits with Jeffrey Byron |Fovitec
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A Glamorous Photoshoot with Jeffrey Byron & The SD-300

Posted on April 14 2016

Seeing Through The Lens

Berenice Abbott said, "Photography helps people to see."  Photography gives us the opportunity to see the past without having been there yourself.

George Hurrell, for example, made a significant contribution in the photographs we see today of old Hollywood glam. Hurrell, the master of Hollywood glamour photography, became well known for his glamorous black and white images. We were lured effortlessly to artist, Jeffrey Byron, as he is channeling Hurrell's style in his latest work. Using a High-Grade Collapsible Pop Out Muslin [Black & White], he was able to create a nostalgic look of the past. With it, we see an intimacy with the camera and a glamour that can only be caught in the studio.

Byron states "I believe it is important when photographing something that you see something in the lens that no one else sees. This is what makes it your picture."

Black and white classic shot       


Focal Point In A Portrait

Being fascinated by lighting and shadows, Byron uses StudioPRO SD 300 Monolight along with his StudioPRO Wireless Flash Trigger to bounce the light onto his subject, minimizing editing time and creating a new perspective for his audience to see. Combining radiant energy and light on a sensitive surface will produce an image but this is not all that goes into the whole of the shot as Byron confirms "[photography] is creative and artistic and a way of expressing myself."

As we melt into the mood of each image, Byron also helps us to see not only the glamour and the character of each shot, but to focus on the eyes.

Leaving us with a memorable tip, he says, "When I shoot portraits, I concentrate on the eyes.  The eyes are what make the picture in a portrait or a headshot."


head shot girl pose      


Flattering Light For An Authentic Touch

In reviewing these portraits, we quickly understood the use of the StudioPRO Octagon Hybrid Umbrella Softbox. Being that this light modifier is great especially for flattering light for portraiture, it was no wonder Byron was able to produce such stunning portraits. Aside from the lighting, what is his secret in creating such credibility in each shot, you ask?

Being in show business himself, he let on that the most important thing he does when shooting is he "quickly finds rapport with [my] subject. That makes them feel relaxed and we get an authentic, slice of life shot."

If you are a fan of Hurrell's work, you may feel you have just seen a ghost. We agree as we see a striking resemblance between many of the pieces. Sincerely, we think it's the bee's knees that Byron took a break from landscape and architecture to bring back some historical black and white glamour shots we were so desperately yearning.


To view more of Byron's work, please visit his website at

Photographer Jeffrey ByronComing from a distinguished show business family, our featured artist spent most of his life in front of the camera, yet Jeffrey Byron has been an ardent photographer for many years. Jeffrey has been commissioned to shoot landscapes and architecture, however, he takes great pride in shooting headshots for actor clients. His passion for photographic painting has taken him all over the world, inspiring some of his most recent work!


  • Chet Stockwell: April 19, 2016

    Lighting is so important when taking portraits. George Hurrell – nice mention he was one of the best!

  • Evelyn Longley: April 15, 2016

    Love the story!Such a great tip to concentrate on the eyes.

  • Coral Thompson: April 15, 2016

    Thank you for this. Just a beautiful story and meaningful quotes. May have inspired me to photograph black and white a few more times.

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